Tag Archives: PGA Tour anti-doping policy

Nov
12
2015

The best and worst part about lawsuits is that in most cases the filings pertaining to the matter are made public record. So, it’s often not hard to find the sometimes juicy paperwork and court documents related to the case (which includes material that those involved may not want everyone perusing).

Well, as you may recall, Vijay Singh is suing the PGA Tour for exposing him to “public humiliation and ridicule” during the investigation and for failure to conduct a thorough job on researching deer antler spray use, which Singh admitted to taking in a story published on SI.com in 2013. He revealed he had taken deer antler spray, which apparently contains IGF-1, a banned substance on the PGA Tour and other major sports leagues as set forth by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA).

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Jul
7
2015

Scott Stallings has been suspended for three months for violating the PGA Tour’s anti-doping policy. Stallings, a three-time winner on Tour, started taking a supplement last December (“DHEA, an anabolic agent that is the precursor to testosterone production and banned by the Tour,” according to GolfChannel.com’s report) to help with his chronic fatigue.

At the time, Stallings didn’t realize it was a prohibited substance, but once he figured it out, he turned himself in.

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Apr
30
2013
Singh: Oh deer!

Singh: Oh deer!

PGA Tour Commissioner Tim Finchem announced in a press conference at Quail Hollow Golf Club on Tuesday that Vijay Singh would not be suspended for using deer antler spray and the case against Singh has now been dropped.

In a Sports Illustrated article earlier this year, Singh revealed he had taken the substance, which contains IGF-1,a banned substance on the PGA Tour and other major sports leagues as set forth by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). Subsequently, he released a statement that expressed his shock and anger, along with his ignorance it was prohibited.

Singh admitted he had used deer antler spray unknowingly, but there wasn’t a positive drug test, so he is in the clear. Basically, while IGF-1 is illegal, it is not a violation unless you test positive — even though there is no way of detecting the substance through blood testing.

Here’s the full statement from the PGA Tour:

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Apr
28
2013
The Shark calls out golf and drugs

The Shark wants stricter drug testing standards in golf

Greg Norman called out golf’s anti-doping procedure and implied the problem in the game goes beyond, say, Vijay Singh using deer-antler spray.

“You only have to look at what happened to Vijay Singh just recently to know the drugs issue is there,” Norman told The Australian on Monday.

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Mar
8
2013
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“They’re going to make you do what!?”

In a move designed to placate critics of its current anti-doping regime, the International Tennis Federation (ITF) has approved the immediate introduction of so-called “biological passport” programmes on each of the sport’s major professional tours.

The announcement, arriving as it does a mere three weeks after NBA commissioner David Stern reiterated his commitment to blood testing, only furthers golf’s isolation from the mainstream of world sport.

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Nov
17
2010

Welcome Back, Doug Barron!

Doug Barron, the first and only player suspended under the PGA Tour’s anti-doping policy, returned to competition on Tuesday at the second-stage of Q-school. He shot two-over 74 in the opening round. With all that he’s had to deal with the past year, it’s hard not to root for the 41-year-old journeyman, who was forced to take an exasperating diversion in the past year. At least in September, Barron finally was granted a therapeutic medical exemption for testosterone. And he’s just happy to put the nightmarish 10 months or so behind him.

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