Tag Archives: HP Byron Nelson Championship

May
14
2014

Jordan Spieth. Photo Credit: Tom Pennington – Getty Images.

Jordan Spieth has been successful at every stage of his golfing career, and he continues to impress with a T2 at The Masters and a T4 at The Players.

Spieth has already cracked the top-10 in the world rankings as a 20-year-old, and is the favorite to win this week at the HP Byron Nelson Championship.  He is on the fast track to superstardom!

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May
14
2014
By Bernie D'Amato under PGA Tour

Sang-Moon Bae. Photo Credit: Tom Pennington – Getty Images.

With Martin Kaymer winning The Players and J.B. Holmes winning the Wells Fargo, no one can be considered an expert at picking champions on the PGA Tour.   A long shot, odds at 50/1 or worse, has a great chance to win because of the strong fields on Tour.

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Jun
1
2011

No, it's not just a dream

The closing holes of the Byron Nelson Championship may have looked like a long, drawn-out grind, but to a PGA Tour rookie waiting nervously in a cabin behind the eighteenth green, events were reaching fever pitch. Keegan Bradley, who was possibly on the verge of his first PGA Tour victory, had just carded a final-round 68. Now, he had to play the waiting game.

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May
27
2011

Many of you (readers) questioned the ruling that official Jon Brendle doled to Andres Gonzales on the ninth hole during the first round at the Byron Nelson Championship. And to be honest, initially, I was confused why he wasn’t under penalty since he grounded the club and then the ball moved. But after speaking with Brendle and Andres, I have a clearer understanding of the circumstances.

Dres hadn’t settled his feet or addressed the ball yet. If you watch the video closely, you’ll see that he never puts the club down directly behind that ball to address it. He placed the club to the back, left of the ball.

“I never ground my club close to the ball,” said Dres via a phone call. “I always ground it at least three inches behind it. I was getting ready to get set up, but I hadn’t addressed it.”

He was surprised he wasn’t under penalty because the ball moved after he grounded the club, and before the ruling, he had already mentally added a shot to his score.

When Brendle, a longtime, highly-respected PGA Tour rules official, arrived to the scene, he asked Dres to show him what he had done. Brendle felt he had put it too far behind the ball to have caused it to move. Since the “lift, clean and place” rule was in effect, Brendle asked Dres if he had already done that, which he had. Dres had placed the ball on a tuft of grass.

“That told me it’d fallen off of (the tuft of grass),” Brendle said on the phone. “There was just no doubt in my mind. Because of where he had put the club, he didn’t cause the ball to move…When he showed me what he did, he was too far behind the ball and left. He wasn’t really taking his stance. He put the club way behind (the ball). It wasn’t really out where you play from.”

Brendle said had he put the club down directly behind the ball, it would have been a penalty and Andres would have had to move the ball back to its original position. The other officials were split on the decision, but Brendle made the call. He acknowledged it was an unusual situation. In fact, it was the first time he hadn’t thought a player was under penalty due to the circumstances.

Andres, who missed the cut, was relieved it wasn’t a penalty, but he felt “weird” initially.

“It almost felt like I was cheating because I grounded my club and the ball moved, but the official said I wasn’t under penalty,” said Andres. “Obviously I was glad it wasn’t. So were my playing partners. No one wants anyone to get a penalty.”

Rule 18-2b is the same rule that the USGA is in the process of changing after the controversy that ensued due to several players receiving penalties which may have impacted the result of tournaments — namely Webb Simpson at the Zurich Classic of New Orleans. For that reason, Andres felt slightly uncomfortable about the situation.

“Since they’re in the middle of changing the rule (18-2) and that was the first time it happened on camera, the whole thing was weird,” he said. “I don’t know, I was given a different ruling than I expected.”

Brendle explained the difference between what happened with Simpson and Andres. “Webb was going into his shot,” he said. “Andres was not really going into his shot. He had pulled the club away and he was looking at his ball.

“That’s the first time I’ve thought a guy wasn’t under penalty. Normally, they are.”

Brendle offered another interesting ruling anecdote. Right after he dealt with Andres, he was called over by Charles Warren, who had a question. Under the “lift, clean and place” rule, the players are given a club length to place the ball from the original position, no closer to the hole.

Warren’s ball was within a club length of a sprinkler head. He asked Brendle if he could place the ball on the sprinkler and then take relief from there. The answer was yes. What’s more, after the drop, Warren’s ball was once again in a new position and he was allowed to lift, clean and place it another club length.

“He ended up moving it three club lengths and changing the shot completely under the rules,” said Brendle.

Knowing the rules usually works to your advantage! And no, Warren’s actions didn’t violate the spirit of the game, in my humble opinion.

May
27
2011

The video above is definitely worth a watch — not just because it involves legendary rookie Andres Gonzales and famed official Jon Brendle, but because the audio is so clear, it gives us a closer look at how Tour rules officials handle rulings and serves as another example of a player calling a penalty on himself.

Dres, who is one of the greatest characters on the PGA Tour, along with having the most creative facial hair (random cool fact: he’s growing out his hair to donate to Locks for Love), tried to call a penalty on himself during the first round of the Byron Nelson Championship. Dres was setting up for his approach shot on No. 9. and put his club down on the ground (not directly behind it, more in back of it — pause the video in the first few seconds to see), but then he suddenly backed off because he believed he had caused the ball to move, which meant he had incurred a one-shot penalty.

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May
27
2011

Sergio's boo boo feels better!

Battling the intense pain of an infected fingernail — his left ring finger — Sergio Garcia managed to grind out a four-under 66 on Thursday at the HP Byron Nelson Championship, putting himself near the top of the leaderboard and two shots behind first-round leader Jeff Overton. On Monday Garcia, who has played in every British Open since 1998, but has yet to qualify for Royal St. Georges in July, withdrew from the Open Qualifier after four holes because he couldn’t grip the club comfortably and the pain was so excruciating that he questioned whether he’d be able to tee it up later in the week at TPC Four Seasons.

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May
25
2011
By Stephanie Wei under PGA Tour

Dustin and Joey, now together!

Dustin Johnson has recorded a T4 and T7 at the Byron Nelson Championship the last two years, so it’s no surprise CBS’ loquacious analyst Gary McCord picked him as one of his two favorites to win (with the other being Rory Sabbatini). McCord gave Dustin a little pep talk that CBS distributed in a press release. “It’s time to quit falling asleep out there Dustin and start winning on a consistent level,” said McCord.

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Feb
24
2011
By Stephanie Wei under Humor

Golf announcer/funnyman David Feherty popped by J. Erik Jonsson Community School in Dallas, Texas, on Wednesday to hang out with young impressionable minds and talk to them about life. Best of all, he got in a velcro suit and the kids got a chance to take shots at him with their golf clubs. Spoiler: Feherty goes down.