Tag Archives: Justin Rose

Sep
28
2014
By Bernie D'Amato under Ryder Cup

 

Jamie Donaldson rode Thomas Bjorn like a bull as the winning European Team entered the post-tournament press conference. Spirits were high, laughs were plentiful, and champagne even more so. To the victor go the spoils, indeed.

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Sep
27
2014

The American Ryder Cup team find themselves in a familiar position heading into Sunday’s singles matches: Losing. After a 3.5-0.5 thrashing in Saturday afternoon foursomes, the Europeans have taken a(nother) commanding lead 10-6 headed into the final day of the biennial matches.

Miracles do happen as we saw only two years ago at Medinah, but the chances of it happening for the Americans on foreign soil are slim to none. To put it bluntly, I’m not seeing “Glory at Gleneagles” — it’s been more like “Goof at Gleneagles,” with several major questionable decisions made by American Captain Tom Watson. (Just a few to start with: Why did he sit the rookies in Friday Foursomes? Why did he play Phil Mickelson and Keegan Bradley twice on Friday? Why didn’t he play them at all on Saturday? Why didn’t he rest Jimmy Walker?)

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Sep
27
2014

Jordan Spieth and Patrick Reed walked away from a hard-fought match against Justin Rose, Europe’s superstar this year, and Martin Kaymer to secure Team USA’s only half point in Saturday afternoon foursomes.

Only problem is the American rookie duo probably should have won the match, but bad breaks and sloppy putting led to a halve and killed any momentum the U.S. could’ve taken with them into the team room after a(nother) 3-1 drubbing in the alternate shot format. Now, the Americans find themselves trailing 10-6 and closing in on its eighth Ryder Cup loss in the last 10 attempts.

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Sep
27
2014
By Stephanie Wei under Ryder Cup

When I looked up at the scoreboard sprawled across the front of the media center Saturday morning, I wasn’t immediately sure which group to follow. The fourball matches were all on the front nine still and my plan was to catch one as they made the turn.

About 15 minutes later, it became brilliantly obvious when I saw the flurry of red numbers posted in the opening match between Europe’s power duo, Justin Rose and Henrik Stenson, and America’s odd couple, Bubba Watson and Matt Kuchar — they were all square as they headed to the back nine, not to mention they were obviously playing very well.

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Sep
26
2014

After a solid Friday morning fourball session for Team USA, the Europeans dominated the afternoon foursomes, winning 3.5 of the total possible 4 points from the second session.

Unfortunately, I was correct in my prediction that the Americans would get throttled (I guessed 3-1), but it was obviously even worse than I anticipated. (Not that anyone cares, but the good news is I correctly predicted the score 2.5-1.5 after the first session, and I have a bet slip to prove it!)

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Sep
26
2014
By Bernie D'Amato under Ryder Cup

 

Henrik Stenson and Justin Rose were an unbeatable duo on day one of The Ryder Cup. In the morning fourball, they crushed Watson and Simpson 5&4. In the afternoon foursomes, they were AS through 14, and continued their dominance with a 2&1 victory over Mahan and Johnson.

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Sep
26
2014

The Captains have set their lineup for the Friday afternoon foursomes and the matches have also been determined. For the few of you not familiar with this format, foursomes is the fancy word that golf’s powers-that-be or someone in Scotland decided to call “alternate shot.” It’s the most entertaining to watch and the toughest to play. It’s the format that really turns golf into a team sport. Simply, it’s awesome.

But I digress. Here are the pairings/matches for the second session in the 40th edition of the Ryder Cup. 

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Aug
5
2014

 

According to Bovada.lv, Rory McIlroy (9/2) is the heavy favorite to win the PGA Championship at Valhalla. Adam Scott (11/1) is the second favorite, and Justin Rose and Sergio Garcia are both at 16/1.

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