Aug
21
2013
Adam Scott: Tiger may want my year
By Stephanie Wei under FedEx Cup
Adam_Scott_2013_Masters_Champion_Australia_Redemption_Greg_Norman

Adam Scott celebrating in the Green Jacket

No question Tiger Woods has had spectacular year — he’s won five times this season, including two World Golf Championships, but once again, he came up short at the majors. I’ve been discussing this topic with several people recently (and I plan on asking other players the same question that Adam Scott addressed today), if Tiger or any other player would trade five regular wins for one major.

It’s a no-brainer to me. He’d rather have a major number 15. 

Asked who has had the best year on the PGA Tour so far, Scott said, “Tiger. Five wins? Has he won five times? Tiger’s had the best year.”

Sure, if you’re counting regular season wins, but we all know one major is worth more than five, six, and even seven “normal” titles because at the end of the day, history judges players on how many majors they’ve won. In other words, major victories define a player’s legacy.

When Scott was asked if he’d rather have his season or Tiger’s and if Tiger would rather have his or Adam’s, the answer was no surprise.

“I’d rather have mine, that’s for sure,” said the reigning Masters champion, smiling. “I really don’t know. He may want mine. I mean, no. 15 is proving to be difficult for him, so that would have given him that. But they have all got to get tougher the more you get.”

I’ve argued that Woods would trade those five regular wins for a major in a heartbeat. And, on Wednesday at Liberty National, Woods admitted he’d prefer the one major versus six titles (or whatever).

Q: Is the season better with six titles full-stop, or none of those and one major, which season for you is better?

Tiger Woods: I think the major, yeah.

Again, this isn’t to “criticize” Tiger’s season because winning five tournaments is really, really hard to do and it’s very impressive, but knowing Tiger and how much breaking Jack Nicklaus’ all-time career major record means to him, it’s just — like he said, himself — “a great year.”
(Photo via PGA.com)